Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

E-Bikes (Electrical Bicycles and Scooters) Related Neurosurgical Injuries in the Adult Population: A Single-Center Experience.

E-bikes (electrical bicycles and scooters) have been increasingly used as a means of transportation, especially among young adults. E-bikers have more accidents, at higher velocities and more severe kinematics, increasing the rate of neurosurgical injuries. Severe neurosurgical injury patterns result in significant morbidity and mortality. We collected data regarding adult patients (>18 years old), who suffered e-bike-related neurosurgical injuries, in a single tertiary medical center in Israel, between July 2019 and June 2020. Fifty-eight consecutive patients were included in this study. The average age was 34.9, and the average Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score upon admission was 13.2 and was significantly lower in operated patients (10.75). Fifty-four patients were riders; 51 (94.5%!) were not wearing a helmet. Fifty percent of patients had multiple types of trauma. Six patients suffered a spinal injury. Sixteen patients required either cranial or spinal surgery. Three patients died, and 1 remained in a vegetative state. Median Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E) score at follow-up was 7.1. Operated patients stayed significantly longer in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the hospital, and their GOS-E scores at discharge and follow-up were significantly lower. Most spinal injuries underwent surgery. Patients who wore helmets had significantly higher GCS scores and a shorter stay in the ICU and hospital. The unacceptable reality of the careless use of this transportation and the unique kinematics lead to severe neurosurgical injuries, comorbidities, and even mortality. Our results reflect the risks of e-bikes in the adult population. Most of our patients were in the mid-age group, and almost none had used a helmet. The results of this study highlight the potential need for neurosurgical treatment, and the need for long-term rehabilitation and follow-up, reflecting the emotional and financial toll of these injuries. Once again, this study showed that helmets save lives and emphasized the importance of protecting our heads.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app