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Outcomes of Women with Preeclampsia and Eclampsia Admitted in the Intensive Care Unit at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mogadishu, Somalia.

Intensive care for a hypertensive mother with preeclampsia or eclampsia is crucial for both maternal and neonatal outcomes. This study highlights the level of morbidity and mortality among women with preeclampsia and eclampsia admitted to the intensive care unit. Methods . This retrospective study was conducted in Mogadishu, Somalia, at the Mogadishu Somali Türkiye Training and Research Hospital from February 2019 to July 2022. The study focused on the different complications, managements, and final outcomes of preeclampsia and eclampsia mothers admitted to the intensive care unit. The data was retrieved from the electronic records of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Results . During our study period, a total of 237 patients were identified as having preeclampsia/eclampsia, of whom 71 required intensive care admission. The mean age of the studied patients was 25 ± 6 years. The most common reason for being taken to the intensive care unit (ICU) was having a seizure ( n  = 33, 46.5%), followed by having very high blood pressure ( n  = 20, 28.2%), and being confused ( n  = 18, 25.3%). Peripartum infection was the most common maternal complication during ICU admission (66.7%), followed by cardiac-related arrhythmia (66.7%), postpartum bleeding (48%), acute kidney injury (18.4%), HELLP syndrome (16.4%), severe anemia (9.6%), and stroke (8.7%). Among patients, 65 (91.5%) needed mechanical ventilation. About 11.1% of these patients died during hospitalization. There were associations between mortality and some complications, particularly acute kidney injury ( p value less than 0.02) and peripartum infection ( p value less than 0.003). Conclusion . Hypertensive disease of pregnancy (preeclampsia/eclampsia) requiring intensive care unit admission has a very high morbidity and mortality rate.

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