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Intestinal Ultrasound Combined with Blood Inflammatory Markers Is a More Efficient Tool in Evaluating Severity of Crohn's Disease: A Pilot Study.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Intestinal ultrasound (IUS) is considered a nonirradiating, noninvasive, well-tolerated, and valuable tool for objectively assessing Crohn's disease (CD) activity. However, there is no widely accepted intestinal ultrasound scoring system. This study is aimed at evaluating the efficacy of IUS key parameters, the International Bowel Ultrasound Activity Score (IBUS-SAS), and IBUS-SAS combined with blood inflammatory markers in assessing CD activity.

METHODS: 40 CD patients were reviewed in this retrospective study and were divided into the moderate-severe group ( n = 25) and nonmoderate-severe group ( n = 15) based on a simplified endoscopic score of Crohn's disease (SES-CD). Double-balloon enteroscopy/colonoscopy were reviewed by three gastroenterologists. A transabdominal ultrasound was performed by two ultrasound specialists. Blood inflammatory markers were measured from morning samples.

RESULTS: In evaluating moderate to severe CD patients, (1) IBUS-SAS had a good predictive effect with an area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.855 ( P < 0.001); (2) IUS key parameters (including BWT, CDS, BWS, and I-fat) yielded good predictive effects with AUC of 0.811, 0.731, 0.724, and 0.747, respectively ( P < 0.001); (3) blood inflammatory markers (including ESR, CRP, PLR, MLR, and NLR) also had good predictive effects with AUC of 0.771, 0.837, 0.728, 0.743, and 0.775, respectively ( P < 0.001); (4) IBUS-SAS combined with ESR and CRP exerted the best predictive effect with the highest AUC of 0.912 (95% CI: 0.823-1.000), and the sensitivity and specificity were 88.0% and 80.0%, respectively ( P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: IBUS-SAS combined with ESR and CRP is a more efficient tool than IBUS-SAS alone or inflammatory markers alone in evaluating CD patients with moderate to severe disease activity.

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