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Knowledge, Attitude, and Behavior of Medical Students with Regard to Concussions: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Curēus 2023 October
BACKGROUND: Concussions, categorized as mild traumatic brain injuries, result from traumatic events and present a significant concern within the field of traumatic brain injuries. Understanding the multifaceted pathophysiology of concussions, their diverse symptomatology, and their appropriate management strategies is crucial for healthcare professionals. This study explores the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of medical students at King Faisal University in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia regarding concussions.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was employed to assess a diverse group of medical students at King Faisal University in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Participants were surveyed using a questionnaire covering socio-demographic information, knowledge assessment, attitude assessment, and behavior assessment.

RESULTS: Of the 315 participants, 68.3% demonstrated good knowledge about concussions. Participants generally recognized concussions as a type of traumatic brain injury (68.9%) and believed it was necessary to report concussion symptoms to a doctor (80.3%). However, certain misconceptions existed, such as the belief that all patients with concussion should rest for seven days (31.7%). Participants primarily obtained information from teachers (100%) and the internet and social media (81.6%).

CONCLUSION: While medical students at King Faisal University in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia generally exhibited good knowledge about concussions, specific knowledge gaps and misconceptions were seen to exist. To ensure comprehensive understanding and promote appropriate management, continuous education, and awareness campaigns are essential, with healthcare providers playing a pivotal role in knowledge dissemination.

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