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Enhancing Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Opioid Use Disorder Among Private Primary Care Clinics: A Quality Improvement Project.

Opioid use disorder (OUD) continues to impact communities worldwide. British Columbia specifically declared a public health emergency in April 2016. It is known that patients with OUD often experience barriers in access to care, including limited knowledge and training among providers, as well as persisting stigma in the medical community. The Doctor of Nursing Practice quality improvement project sought to provide barrier-targeted OUD education while using multiple effective teaching methods, such as test-enhanced learning, to family nurse practitioners (FNPs) working among private primary care clinics to assess the impact on knowledge and attitudes. In review of an experience survey, zero participants had received prior education on OUD (N = 7). The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire was used to assess attitudes. In review of the data, attitudes before receiving education (Mdn = 74) improved after receiving barrier-targeted education (Mdn = 66), W = 0, p < .05. Knowledge was tested at three time points. After a review of unique identifiers, four participant tests were successfully linked. It was found that knowledge after receiving education (M = 7.75, Mdn = 7.5) improved in comparison with baseline knowledge (M = 6, Mdn = 6) and further improved after a 1-month time frame (M = 8.5, Mdn = 8.5). Although the project was limited by sample size, providing education to FNPs who have not received prior education on OUD, and using modalities such as test-enhanced learning, showed a favorable impact on knowledge and attitudes. In light of the opioid epidemic, nursing leaders must continue to actively engage practicing FNPs and students with OUD education. FNPs are well positioned to be champions in this area and may mobilize teams to overcome barriers among private primary care clinics and increase access to care.

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