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Effect of one or more microorganisms on the yield components of upland rice under greenhouse conditions.

The use of beneficial microorganisms is an important strategy to improve rice production in a sustainable way. The study was carried out to determine the effect of single and combined beneficial microorganism on the development of upland rice. The experiment was performed in greenhouse and arranged in a completely randomized design with 29 treatments and 4 replications. Treatments consisted of rice seeds cultivar BRS A501 CL treated with single and combined multifunctional microorganisms (1 ( Serratia marcescens), 2 ( Bacillus toyonensis ), 3 ( Phanerochaete australis) , 4 ( Trichoderma koningiopsis) , 5 ( Azospirillum brasilense), 6 ( Azospirillum sp.), 7 ( Bacillus sp.), 8 to 28 (combination of all these microorganisms in pairs) and 29 (control)). Inoculation of upland rice with sole and combined microorganism on upland rice increased the roots and shoots development, yield components and grain yield of upland rice. The combinations of Bacillus sp. (BRM 63573) and A. brasilense (AbV5), Azospirillum sp. (BRM 63574) + B. toyonensis (BRM 32110) and Phanerochaete australis (BRM 62389) + Serratia marcenscens (BRM 32114) led to improved roots and shoots development; increased number of panicles and grains per pot, 1000 grains weight and grain yield of rice plants. Besides, the combinations allow helped in increased accumulation of nutrients in roots, shoots and grains of rice plants.

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