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Pregnancy outcomes following antenatal screening for intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP).

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the maternal and perinatal outcomes following antenatal screening for ICP using a retrospective approach.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at the second affiliated hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China, from 2012 to 2017. Pregnant women registered for antenatal in our hospital were screened for ICP. The pregnant women with detailed delivery record and presenting with the diagnosis of ICP based on TBA level ≥10 mmol/L and abnormal liver enzymes were included in the study.

METHOD: The pregnant women with detailed delivery records presenting with the diagnosis of ICP based on TBA level ≥10 mmol/L and abnormal liver enzymes were included in the study. 1410 pregnant women were enrolled in this study. We selected 940 pregnant women without the diagnosis of ICP as our control and 470 pregnant women diagnosed with ICP as our case study. Data collection and sampling in the control group was done using microsoft excel (version 16.61) random number generator.

RESULTS: The mean age of the pregnant women and the gestational age at the time of diagnosis of ICP were 29.01 ± 4.3 years and 31.90 ± 8.83 weeks, respectively. It was found that a significant number of patients with ICP had a preterm birth and low birth weight (LBW), n = 151 (32.5%) P < 0.001 and n = 70 (14.9%) P < 0.001, respectively. A significant number of patients in the case group had a history of liver disease and gall bladder disease, p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively, and a higher rate of GDM p < 0.001. Despite treatment, high TBA titer among ICP patients was associated with preterm delivery.

CONCLUSION: ICP in pregnancy leads to complications and poor perinatal outcomes. Fetal outcomes depend on the TBA levels; therefore, early diagnosis of ICP through routine screening followed by treatment is recommended in high-risk persons/areas.

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