Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Gender-Related Factors Influence the Subjective Perception of Deformity in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Idiopathic Scoliosis.

The present study aims to depict the importance of gender-related factors in the subjective perception of spine deformity in adolescents undergoing posterior instrumented fusion for scoliosis. Patients undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion (PSF) for idiopathic adolescent scoliosis (AIS) were recruited. The following data were recorded: gender, age, parents' civil status, Tegner Activity Scale (TAS), body mass index (BMI), concomitant diseases, and history of neuropsychological disorders. Each patient underwent clinical and radiological evaluations according to the protocol used at our institution. All the patients were assessed before surgery using the following Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs): the Italian version of the revised Scoliosis Research Society-22 patient questionnaire (SRS-22R), the Quality-of-Life Profile for Spinal Deformities (QLPSDs) questionnaire, and the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire (SAQ). The present study recruited 80 patients (male: 19, female: 61). A significant correlation was observed between BMI, TAS, and subjective perception scores. A worse deformity perception was observed in female patients and patients with divorced parents. Gender-related factors impact the subjective perception of spine deformity in patients undergoing PSF for AIS. Specific assessment and correction are needed to improve postoperative outcomes in these patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app