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A retrospective study to investigate the efficacy and safety of granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis with ulcerative colitis.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis has a poor prognosis and can be accompanied by ulcerative colitis. Infection control is essential, so immunosuppressive drugs should ideally be preferably. Granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis does not suppress the immune system and is used to treat ulcerative colitis. Therefore, this study investigated the efficacy and safety of granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis.

METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated data from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis with ulcerative colitis who visited our hospital from April 2000 to December 2022 and underwent granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis (n = 10, number of treatment cycles = 15). Study endpoints were remission induction rate and safety, assessed as changes in liver functions and adverse events.

RESULTS: Seven of the 10 patients were male. The median (min-max) age was 23 (18-77) years. The most common disease type was right-dominant pancolitis. Remission occurred after 86.6% of cycles (13/15). Serum alkaline phosphatase and Aspartate transaminase were significantly lower after treatment (P = .0124, P = .002), and no negative effects on liver function were seen. The only adverse events were headache (n = 1) and decreased blood pressure (n = 1).

CONCLUSIONS: Granulocyte and monocyte adsorptive apheresis has high efficacy for intestinal lesions and improves alkaline phosphatase and aspartate transaminase levels (high levels are a poor prognosis factor). It appears to be a treatment option in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with ulcerative colitis.

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