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The value of radiographic features in predicting postoperative facial nerve function in vestibular schwannoma patients: A retrospective study and nomogram analysis.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify significant prognostic factors associated with facial paralysis after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery and develop a novel nomogram for predicting facial nerve (FN) outcomes.

METHODS: Retrospective data were retrieved from 355 patients who underwent microsurgery via the retrosigmoid approach for VS between December 2017 and December 2022. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to construct a radiographic features-based nomogram to predict the risk of facial paralysis after surgery.

RESULTS: Following a thorough screening process, a total of 185 participants were included. The univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that tumor size (p = 0.005), fundal fluid cap (FFC) sign (p = 0.014), cerebrospinal fluid cleft (CSFC) sign (p < 0.001), and expansion of affected side of internal auditory canal (IAC) (p = 0.033) were independent factors. A nomogram model was constructed based on these indicators. When applied to the validation cohort, the nomogram demonstrated good discrimination and favorable calibration. Then we generated a web-based calculator to facilitate clinical application.

CONCLUSION: Tumor size, FFC and CSFC sign, and the expansion of the IAC, serve as good predictors of postoperative FN outcomes. Based on these factors, the nomogram model demonstrates good predictive performance.

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