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Mushroom consumption and hyperuricemia: results from the National Institute for Longevity Sciences-Longitudinal Study of Aging and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2018).

Nutrition Journal 2023 November 23
BACKGROUND: Prior study reported that mushroom consumption was associated with a lower incidence of hyperuricemia, but there is limited evidence on this association. We conducted a collaborative study to investigate the association between mushroom intake and hyperuricemia in middle-aged and older populations.

METHODS: We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in the U.S. (2007-2018) and the National Institute for Longevity Sciences-Longitudinal Study of Aging (NILS-LSA) in Japan (1997-2012). Consumption of mushroom (g/day) were measured by one- or two-day dietary recall in NHANES and by 3-day dietary records in the NILS-LSA. Hyperuricemia was defined using uric acid levels as > 420 μmol/L and > 350 μmol/L in NHANES for men and women, respectively; in the NILS-LSA, serum uric acid was repeatedly measured at baseline and follow-up surveys. Hyperuricemia was defined as uric acid levels > 416.4 μmol/L for men and ≥ 356.9 μmol/L for women. Logistic regression models in NHANES (cross-sectionally) and Generalized Estimation Equations in NILS-LSA (longitudinally) were performed.

RESULTS: A total of 5,778 NHANES participants (mean (SD) age: 53.2 (9.6) years) and 1,738 NILS-LSA (mean (SD) age: 53.5 (11.2) years) were included. Mushrooms were consumed by 5.7% of participants in NHANES and 81.2% in NILS-LSA. We did not observe a significant association between mushroom intakes and hyperuricemia in the NHANES men and women. However, in the NILS-LSA, compared to non-consumers, a higher mushroom intake was associated with a lower risk of incident hyperuricemia in men under 65 years old. The adjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for non-consumers, participants with middle, and the highest consumption of mushrooms were 1.00 (Ref.), 0.77 (0.44, 1.36), and 0.55 (0.31, 0.99), respectively (P-trend = 0.036). No association was found in women in NILS-LSA.

CONCLUSIONS: Mushroom consumption was associated with a lower risk of incident hyperuricemia in Japanese men.

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