JOURNAL ARTICLE
META-ANALYSIS
REVIEW
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
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Early ambulation versus prolonged bed rest for incidental durotomies in spine procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Neurosurgical Review 2023 November 23
Incidental durotomies are frequent complications of spine surgery associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak-related symptoms. Management typically involves prolonged bed rest to reduce CSF pressure at the durotomy site. However, early ambulation may be a safer, effective alternative. PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane, and Scopus were systematically searched for studies comparing early ambulation (bed rest ≤ 24 h) with prolonged bed rest (> 24 h) for patients with incidental durotomies in spine surgeries. The outcomes of interest were CSF leak, hypotensive headache, additional surgical repair, pseudomeningocele, and pulmonary complications. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis were performed following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We included a total of 704 patients from 6 studies. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of pulmonary complications (RR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.67; p = 0.007) in the early mobilization group. The incidence of CSF leak (RR 1.34; 95% CI 0.83-2.14; p = 0.23), hypotensive headache (RR 0.72; 95% CI 0.27-1.90; p = 0.50), additional repair surgery (RR 1.29; 95% CI 0.76-2.2; p = 0.35), and pseudomeningocele (RR 1.29; 95% CI 0.20-8.48; p = 0.79) did not differ significantly. In patients with incidental durotomy following spinal surgery, early mobilization was associated with a lower incidence of pulmonary complications as compared with prolonged bed rest. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of CSF leak, need for additional repair, pseudomeningocele, and hypotensive headache.

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