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Effects of nutritional indices and inflammatory parameters on patients received immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

OBJECTIVE: This research explored the relationship between a patient's nutritional state and inflammatory markers and the prognosis of their non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment while receiving a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy.

METHOD: This retrospective and single-center analysis included NSCLC patients who received a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy at the Department of Oncology at Shanghai Lung Hospital. Patients were categorized based on malnutrition, sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity, and advanced-lung-cancer-inflammation-index (ALI) scores after collecting nutritional and inflammatory indices. Kaplan-Meier and the Cox models were utilized to analyze survival.

RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between malnutrition, sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity, and low ALI scores with lower overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p < 0.05). Low ALI score and malnutrition were independent factors influencing patient survival in terms of both OS and PFS (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: The nutritional and inflammatory indices of immunotherapy-treated NSCLC patients substantially affect their prognosis. Assessing these variables could aid in optimizing treatment strategies and improving patient outcomes. Additional research is required to comprehend the intricate relationship between nutrition, inflammation, and cancer progression and to develop individualized therapies.

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