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Evaluation of the participation of ABCA1 transporter in epicardial and mediastinal adipose tissue from patients with coronary artery disease.

OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown a relationship between adipose tissue and coronary artery disease (CAD). The ABCA1 transporter regulates cellular cholesterol content and reverses cholesterol transport. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) R230C, C-17G, and C-69T and their expression in epicardial and mediastinal adipose tissue in Mexican patients with CAD.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study included 71 patients with CAD and a control group consisting of 64 patients who underwent heart valve replacement. SNPs were determined using TaqMan probes. mRNA was extracted using TriPure Isolation from epicardial and mediastinal adipose tissue. Quantification and expression analyses were done using RT-qPCR.

RESULTS: R230C showed a higher frequency of the GG genotype in the CAD group (70.4%) than the control group (57.8%) [OR 0.34, 95% CI (0.14-0.82) p = 0.014]. Similarly, C-17G (rs2740483) showed a statistically significant difference in the CC genotype in the CAD group (63.3%) in comparison to the controls (28.1%) [OR 4.42, 95% CI (2.13-9.16), p = 0.001]. mRNA expression in SNP R230C showed statistically significant overexpression in the AA genotype compared to the GG genotype in CAD patients [11.01 (4.31-15.24) vs. 3.86 (2.47-12.50), p = 0.015].

CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the GG genotype of R230C and CC genotype of C-17G are strongly associated with the development of CAD in Mexican patients. In addition, under-expression of mRNA in the GG genotype in R230C is associated with patients undergoing revascularization.

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