Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Postpartum acute adrenal insufficiency of early-onset Sheehan syndrome: A case series study in a single center.

AIM: To identify the symptoms and relevant factors associated with acute adrenal insufficiency of early-onset Sheehan syndrome.

METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 125 women admitted to our intensive care unit because of postpartum hemorrhage between January 2011 and December 2021. Three women developed acute adrenal insufficiency. We investigated the total blood loss, shock status, consciousness level upon arrival, and intensive care provided to the women. We also analyzed the symptoms and laboratory data that led to the diagnosis of acute adrenal insufficiency. Continuous variables were presented by median (minimum-maximum).

RESULTS: The medians and ranges of age, total blood loss, and shock index [heart rate/systolic blood pressure] on admission were 33.1 (17.2-45.3) years, 3351 (595-20 260) g, and 0.94 (0.55-2.94), respectively. Seven women were older than 40 years, 28 experienced >5000 g blood loss, 17 had shock index >1.5, 27 had impaired consciousness upon arrival, and 15 underwent hysterectomy. Women who developed acute adrenal insufficiency were <40 years old and had a bleeding volume of over 5000 g, impaired consciousness upon arrival, and had undergone hysterectomy. They had experienced lactation failure, presented with hyponatremia-related symptoms on postpartum days 8-9, experienced general malaise, headache, and impaired consciousness, and showed severe hyponatremia.

CONCLUSIONS: Massive postpartum hemorrhage over 5000 g, impaired consciousness upon arrival, and hysterectomy as a hemostatic measure were relevant factors associated with acute adrenal insufficiency of early-onset Sheehan syndrome. Hyponatremia-related symptoms occurring after lactation failure are indicative of the onset of acute adrenal insufficiency.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app