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Prenatal Exposition to Haloperidol: A Preclinical Narrative Review.

Pre-existing maternal mental disorders may affect the early interactions between mother and baby, impacting the child's psychoemotional development. The typical antipsychotic haloperidol can be used during pregnancy, even with some restrictions. Its prescription is not limited to psychotic disorders, but also to other psychiatric conditions of high incidence and prevalence in the woman's fertile period. The present review focused on the preclinical available data regarding the biological and behavioral implications of embryonic exposure to haloperidol. The understanding of the effects of psychotropic drugs during neurodevelopment is important for its clinical aspect since there is limited evidence regarding the risks of antipsychotic drug treatment in pregnant women and their children. Moreover, a better comprehension of the mechanistic events that can be affected by antipsychotic treatment during the critical period of neurodevelopment may offer insights into the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. The findings presented in this review converge to the existence of several risks associated with prenatal exposure to such medication and emphasize the need for further studies regarding its dimensions.

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