Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Virulence attributes of successful methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

SUMMARYMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of severe and often fatal infections. MRSA epidemics have occurred in waves, whereby a previously successful lineage has been replaced by a more fit and better adapted lineage. Selection pressures in both hospital and community settings are not uniform across the globe, which has resulted in geographically distinct epidemiology. This review focuses on the mechanisms that trigger the establishment and maintenance of current, dominant MRSA lineages across the globe. While the important role of antibiotic resistance will be mentioned throughout, factors which influence the capacity of S. aureus to colonize and cause disease within a host will be the primary focus of this review. We show that while MRSA possesses a diverse arsenal of toxins including alpha-toxin, the success of a lineage involves more than just producing toxins that damage the host. Success is often attributed to the acquisition or loss of genetic elements involved in colonization and niche adaptation such as the arginine catabolic mobile element, as well as the activity of regulatory systems, and shift metabolism accordingly (e.g., the accessory genome regulator, agr ). Understanding exactly how specific MRSA clones cause prolonged epidemics may reveal targets for therapies, whereby both core (e.g., the alpha toxin) and acquired virulence factors (e.g., the Panton-Valentine leukocidin) may be nullified using anti-virulence strategies.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app