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Old age as a risk factor for liver diseases: Modern therapeutic approaches.

Experimental Gerontology 2023 November 16
Recent scientific interest has been directed towards age-related diseases, driven by the significant increase in global life expectancy and the growing population of individuals aged 65 and above. The ageing process encompasses various biological, physiological, environmental, psychological, behavioural, and social changes, leading to an augmented susceptibility to chronic illnesses. Cardiovascular, neurological, musculoskeletal, liver and oncological diseases are prevalent in the elderly. Moreover, ageing individuals demonstrate reduced regenerative capacity and decreased tolerance towards therapeutic interventions, including organ transplantation. Liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, have emerged as significant public health concerns. Paradoxically, these conditions remain underestimated despite their substantial global impact. Age-related factors are closely associated with the severity and unfavorable prognosis of various liver diseases, warranting further investigation to enhance clinical management and develop novel therapeutic strategies. This comprehensive review focuses specifically on age-related liver diseases, their treatment strategies, and contemporary practices. It provides a detailed account of the global burden, types, molecular mechanisms, and epigenetic alterations underlying these liver pathologies.

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