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Comparison of the Effect of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy mindfulness-based Stress Reduction on Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms, Quality of Life, Anxiety and Depression: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Psychiatric Quarterly 2023 November 18
This study aimed to compare dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) effects on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression among patients with IBS. Eighty three eligible patients with a Rome- IV diagnosis were randomly allocated in DBT, MBSR, ACT, and control groups (n = 22 per group). All the patients were evaluated for IBS symptoms by IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS), QOL by irritable bowel syndrome quality of life (IBS-QOL), anxiety by Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and depression by Beck Depression Inventory- II (BDI-II) on the studied groups at the time of their inclusion in the study and 8 weeks after it. Each of the intervention groups took part in 8 group sessions. Conversely, the control group were evaluated without any intervention. 54 male and 29 female in 4 groups completed the study: DBT (n = 20), MBSR (n = 19), ACT (n = 22), and control groups (n = 22). The results showed significant differences between the groups based on the variables of the IBS-SSS, IBS-QOL, BAI and BDI-II (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the ACT intervention had considerably lower levels of IBS symptoms, anxiety, and depression compared to the other groups; also, the significant impacts of the QOL variable showed the higher scores of the ACT compared to the treatment groups. The therapies could not be applied to other groups of people. Other shortcomings were the absence of a follow-up strategy. This research offers preliminary evidence that ACT is more successful than other therapy groups in reducing IBS symptoms, anxiety and sadness, and improving QOL in IBS patients.

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