Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Influence of radiological factors, psychosocial factors, and central sensitization-related symptoms on clinical symptoms in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

BACKGROUND: No study to date has concurrently evaluated the impact of radiological factors, psychosocial factors, and central sensitization (CS) related symptoms in a single lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) patient cohort.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between these factors and clinical symptoms in LSS patients.

METHODS: We recruited 154 patients with LSS scheduled for surgery. Patient-reported outcome measures and imaging evaluation including clinical symptoms, psychosocial factors, CS-related symptoms, and radiological classifications. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses were employed.

RESULTS: Spearman's correlation revealed CS-related symptoms positively correlated with low back pain (r= 0.25, p< 0.01), leg pain (r= 0.26, p< 0.01), and disability (r= 0.32, p< 0.01). Pain catastrophizing positively correlated with leg pain (r= 0.23, p< 0.01) and disability (r= 0.36, p< 0.01). Regression analysis showed that pain catastrophizing was associated with disability (β= 0.24, 95%CI = 0.03-0.18), and CS-related symptoms with low back pain (β= 0.28, 95%CI = 0.01-0.09). Radiological classifications were not associated with clinical symptoms.

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that psychosocial factors and CS-related symptoms, rather than radiological factors, seem to contribute to clinical symptoms in patients with LSS.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app