Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of Local Ketamine Subcutaneous Injection at the Incision Site in Reducing the Postoperative Pain Score after Transabdominal Hysterectomy.

BACKGROUND: Pain control after operations is essential in decreasing the patient recovery period and potential morbidity. Prescribing opiates is very effective, but significant side effects accompany them. This study aims to examine the effect of local ketamine infiltration in decreasing pain intensity in patients undergoing transabdominal hysterectomy.

METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial, a total of 92 patients undergoing transabdominal hysterectomy aged 30-60 years were selected and divided into two intervention and control groups randomly. For the intervention group, ketamine was injected subcutaneously into the incision site at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg after the operation. In the control group, 5 mg normal saline was used in the same method. Postoperative pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS: 0-10). The pain score and dose of administered opioids were documented at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours and compared between the two groups.

RESULTS: Postoperative pain intensity was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group, except for hour 24. The mean amounts of administered opioids were significantly lower in the intervention group at hours 6 and 12, as well as the total amount of used opioids, and no significant side effects were documented.

CONCLUSION: Local ketamine subcutaneous injection in the incisional site is effective and is a safe procedure for reducing pain scores in patients who underwent a transabdominal hysterectomy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app