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Efficacy of wearable vibration dressings on full-thickness wound healing in a hyperglycemic rat model.

Local low-frequency vibration promotes blood flow and wound healing in hard-to-heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). However, vibration treatment is challenging in patients with DFUs due to wound management difficulties and low adherence. Consequently, developing wearable self-care devices becomes imperative for effective wound healing. This study introduces a wearable vibration dressing and assesses its impact on wound healing in hyperglycemic rats. Low-frequency vibration at 52 Hz was applied to the wound for 40 min/day in awake rats. Relative wound areas on post-wounding days (PWDs) 4-7 were significantly smaller and the wound closure rate was significantly higher in the vibration group than in the control group (p < 0.05, respectively). The total hemoglobin at baseline and after vibration on post-wounding day 7 was significantly larger in the vibration group than in the control group (p < 0.05). On PWD 7, the thickness of the granulation tissue was significantly higher in the vibration group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the number of blood vessels at the wound site and vascular endothelial growth factor A protein expression were significantly higher in the vibration group than in the control group (p < 0.05, respectively). The ratio of (CD68+ /iNOS+ )/(CD163+ ) macrophages in the vibration group was significantly lower than that in the control group (p < 0.05). These results indicate the potential of wearable vibration dressings as new self-care devices that can promote angiogenesis and blood flow, improve inflammation, and enhance wound healing in DFUs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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