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Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 promoter variant (rs2854744) is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

OBJECTIVE: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease and a growing global epidemic. In NAFLD, liver fat surpasses 5% of hepatocytes without the secondary causes of lipid accumulation or excessive alcohol consumption. Given the link between NAFLD and insulin resistance, the possible association between the rs2854744 (-202 G>T) promoter polymorphism of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 ( IGFBP3 ) gene and NAFLD was investigated in this study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this genetic case-control association study, the IGFBP3 rs2854744 genotypes of 315 unrelated individuals, including 156 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 159 controls, were determined using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

RESULTS: The "GT+TT" genotype of the IGFBP3 rs2854744 polymorphism, compared with the "GG" genotype, was associated with a 2.7-fold increased risk of NAFLD after adjustment for confounding factors (P = 0.009; odds ratio [OR] = 2.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.19-3.18). Additionally, the IGFBP3 rs2854744 "T" allele, in comparison with the "G" allele, was significantly overrepresented in NAFLD patients than the controls (P = 0.008; OR = 1.85; 95%CI = 1.23-2.94).

CONCLUSION: Our findings first indicated that the IGFBP3 rs2854744 "GT+TT" genotype is a marker of increased NAFLD susceptibility; however, it needs to be supported by further investigations in other populations.

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