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Exploration of Metabolite Biomarkers to Predict the Efficacy of Dupilumab Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis.

Dupilumab (DUP) is the first biological agent used treating atopic dermatitis (AD). Notwithstanding its high cost, the type of patient group for which the drug is effective remains unclear. In this retrospective study, we aimed to identify novel and reliable biomarkers which can be measured before DUP administration and to predict the efficacy of DUP. Serum samples from 19 patients with AD treated with DUP were analysed by metabolome analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total 148 metabolites were detected, and the relative values of the metabolites were compared between the patient group that achieved 75% improvement in Eczema Area and Severity Index 16 weeks after administration of DUP (high responders: HR; n  = 11) and that did not (low responders: LR; n  = 8). The HR and LR groups had significant differences in the relative values of the eight metabolites (lactic acid, alanine, glyceric acid, fumaric acid, nonanoic acid, ribose, sorbitol, and ornithine), with ribose emerging as the best. Furthermore, we evaluated the serum concentrations of ribose and found that ribose may be a useful metabolite biomarker for predicting the efficacy of DUP in AD.

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