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Standardized in vitro Models of Human Adipose Tissue Reveal Metabolic Flexibility in Brown Adipocyte Thermogenesis.

Endocrinology 2023 November 8
Functional human brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT) are vital for thermoregulation and nutritional homeostasis, while obesity and other stressors lead, respectively, to cold intolerance and metabolic disease. Understanding BAT and WAT physiology and dysfunction necessitates clinical trials complemented by mechanistic experiments at the cellular level. These require standardized in vitro models, currently lacking, that establish references for gene expression and function. In response, we generated and characterized a pair of immortalized, clonal human brown (hBA) and white (hWA) preadipocytes derived from the perirenal and subcutaneous depots, respectively, of a 40-year-old male. Cells were immortalized with hTERT and confirmed to be of a mesenchymal, non-hematopoietic lineage based on FACS sorting and DNA barcoding. Functional assessments showed that the hWA and hBA phenocopied primary adipocytes in terms of adrenergic signaling, lipolysis, and thermogenesis. Compared to hWA, the hBA were metabolically distinct, with higher rates of glucose uptake, lactate metabolism, and greater basal, maximal, and non-mitochondrial respiration, which provide a mechanistic explanation for the association between obesity and BAT dysfunction. hBA also responded to the stress of maximal respiration by using both endogenous and exogenous fatty acids. In contrast to certain mouse models, hBA adrenergic thermogenesis was mediated by several mechanisms, not principally via uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). Transcriptomics via RNA-seq were consistent with the functional studies and established a molecular signature for each cell type before and after differentiation. These standardized cells are anticipated to become a common resource for future physiological, pharmacological, and genetic studies of human adipocytes.

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