Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical Significance of Stiffness during Endoscopic Surgery for Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Study.

Studies regarding hematoma stiffness and removal difficulty are scarce. This study explored the association between hematoma stiffness and surgical results of endoscopic hematoma removal for intracerebral hemorrhage. It also aimed to clarify factors associated with hematoma stiffness. We classified intracerebral hematoma as either soft or firm stiffness by retrospectively evaluating operative videos by two neurosurgeons. The interobserver reliability of the classification was assessed by calculating the κ values. We investigated the relationship between hematoma stiffness and surgical results. Favorable hematoma removal (FHR) was defined as a residual hematoma volume of ≤15 mL or removal rate of ≥70%. Furthermore, we compared the background characteristics, imaging findings, and laboratory data between the two groups. Forty patients were included in this study. The mean baseline hematoma volume was 69.9 mL (range, 41.3-97.6 mL). FHR was accomplished in 35 cases (87.5%). Thirty-four patients (85%) were in the soft hematoma group (group S). Six patients (15%) were in the firm hematoma group (group F). Classification of hematoma stiffness demonstrated an excellent degree of interobserver agreement (κ score = 0.91). Patients in group S had a high FHR rate (p = 0.018) and short endoscopic procedure times (p = 0.00034). The island sign was present in group S (p = 0.030). Patients in group F had significantly high fibrinogen levels (p = 0.049) and low serum total calcium (p = 0.032), hemoglobin (p = 0.041), and hematocrit (p = 0.011) levels. Hematoma stiffness during endoscopic surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage correlates with surgical results, including the endoscopic procedure time and accomplishing rate of FHR.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app