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Osteoprotegerin is associated with subclinical left ventricular systolic dysfunction in non-dipper hypertensive patients: a 2D speckle tracking echocardiographic study.

BACKGROUND: Past studies have shown that non-dipper hypertensive patients have more frequent subclinical left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction compared to dippers. Many different parameters have been examined to predict subclinical LV dysfunction. The role of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the pathogenesis of heart failure and LV systolic dysfunction through different mechanisms had well described. In the present study, we hypothesized that increased OPG levels could predict subclinical LV systolic dysfunction in non-dipper hypertensive patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Hypertensive patients were divided into two groups according to the results of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Non-dipper patients were subsequently divided into two further groups (normal LV function and impaired LV function) according to LV global longitudinal strain (GLS).

RESULTS: A total of 103 hypertensive patients (51 dippers, 52 non-dippers) were included in the study. In the non-dipper group, LV GLS was normal in 21 patients and impaired in 31 patients. Based on the results of the multivariate logistic regression test, it was determined that OPG levels (OR: 2.413, 95% CI: 1.284-4.535, P = 0.006) and LVMI (OR: 1.086, 95% CI: 1.013-1.165, P = 0.021) were independently associated with impaired GLS.

CONCLUSION: Higher OPG values were associated with subclinical LV systolic dysfunction in non-dipper hypertensive patients. It could be used for the early diagnosis of subclinical LV systolic dysfunction, which would allow for strategies to be designed to reduce the cardiovascular event rate in this patient population.

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