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Cardiovascular diseases, risk factors, and ulcer relapse in older adults with aphthous stomatitis.

OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that cardiovascular diseases and risk factors are associated with ulcer relapse in after-retirement patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This retrospective cohort study analyzed the data of 40 minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients aged 55-75 years, admitted to Oral Medicine Clinic at one university hospital in China between 2016 and 2018. The diagnosis of minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis was made based on the history and manifestation of oral ulcers. The ulcer relapse was evaluated after a 5-week anti-inflammatory treatment, and the history of systemic diseases was collected. cardiovascular disease/metabolic risk referred to the presence of any cardiovascular diseases and metabolic cardiovascular disease risks. Associations among cardiovascular diseases, risk factors, and ulcer relapse were evaluated.

RESULTS: The mean age of 40 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis was 62.4 years (SD 5.1), and 60% were women. The ulcer relapse rate was 37.5% (95% CI, 0.242-0.530). The proportion of cardiovascular disease/metabolic risk was higher in the relapse group than in the no-relapse group after 5-week anti-inflammatory treatment (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.041).

CONCLUSIONS: According to this single-center experience, older patients with cardiovascular disease/metabolic risk may be more prone to oral ulcer recurrence. Nevertheless, larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings.

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