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An Economic Modeling Analysis of an Intensive GDMT Optimization Program in Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients.

Background: The STRONG-HF trial demonstrated substantial reductions in the composite of mortality and morbidity over 6 months among hospitalized heart failure patients who were randomized to intensive guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) optimization compared to usual care. Whether an intensive GDMT optimization program would be cost-effective for patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is unknown. Methods: Using a 2-state Markov model we evaluated the effect of an intensive GDMT optimization program on hospitalized patients with HFrEF. Two population models were created to simulate this intervention, a "Clinical Trial" model, based off the participants in the STRONG-HF trial and a "Real-World" model, based off the Get With The Guidelines-HF Registry of patients admitted with worsening HF. We then modeled the effect of a 6-month intensive triple therapy GDMT optimization program comprised of cardiologists, clinical pharmacists, and registered nurses. Hazard ratios from the intervention arm of the STRONG-HF trial were applied to both populations models to simulate clinical and financial outcomes of an intensive GDMT optimization program from a United States healthcare sector perspective with a lifetime time horizon. Optimal quadruple GDMT use was also modeled. Results: An intensive GDMT optimization program was extremely cost-effective with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios <$10,000 per quality-adjusted life year in both models. Optimal quadruple GDMT implementation resulted in the most gains in life years with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of $60,000 and $54,000 in the Clinical Trial and Real-World models, respectively. Conclusions: An intensive GDMT optimization program for patients hospitalized with HFrEF would be cost-effective and result in substantial gains in clinical outcomes especially with use of optimal quadruple GDMT. Clinicians, payers, and policy makers should prioritize creation of such programs.

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