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Study of Allergy and Sensitization Relationship in Children and Parents in Southern China.

INTRODUCTION: The incidence of allergic diseases has increased globally, with genetics playing an essential role in these conditions' development. However, there is still a gap in understanding of how parental allergy status affects children's allergies.

METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was used to assess allergy-related symptoms in kindergarten children and their parents, with a clinical diagnosis and concurrent serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), total IgE, and blood cell counts obtained.

RESULTS: 88 family groups were enrolled, with allergy prevalence of 85.2% in children, 50% in fathers, and 42% in mothers. Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was the most common allergic disease. When the mother had an allergy, the children's allergy diagnosis rate was 91.3%; 86.67% when the father had an allergy; and 85.71% when both parents had allergies. The child sensitization rate was 78.26% when the father had sensitization, 59.09% just as the mother had sensitization, and 84.21% when both parents had sensitization. Paternal allergies affected children's quality of life due to allergic rhinitis but not their rhinitis symptoms. Maternal allergies or sensitization did not significantly affect children's symptoms or quality-of-life scores.

CONCLUSION: The study found a positive correlation between childhood and parental allergies, and further studies are needed to confirm the findings.

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