JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Selectivity, efficacy and safety of JAKinibs: new evidence for a still evolving story.

Fundamental insight gained over the last decades led to the discovery of cytokines as pivotal drivers of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis/psoriasis arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, atopic dermatitis and spondylarthritis. A deeper understanding of the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects of various cytokines has prompted new cytokine-targeting therapies, which revolutionised the treatment options in the last years for patients with inflammatory disorders. Disease-associated immune responses typically involve a complex interplay of multiple cytokines. Therefore, blockade of one single cytokine does not necessarily lead to a persistent remission in all patients with inflammatory disorders and fostered new therapeutic strategies targeting intracellular pathways shared by multiple cytokines. By inhibiting JAK-STAT signalling pathways common to families of cytokines, JAK-inhibitors (JAKinibs) have created a new paradigm for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Multiple agents have been approved for various disorders and more are being investigated for several new indications. Second-generation selective JAKinibs have been devised with the aim to achieve an increased selectivity and a possible reduced risk of side effects. In the current review, we will summarise the current body of evidence of pan versus selective JAKinibs and the most recent insights on new side effects and indications, including COVID-19.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app