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Secretory Breast Carcinoma: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review.

Secretory Breast Carcinoma (SBC) is a rare subtype of breast cancer, predominantly affecting young women, and characterized by hormone receptor-negative and HER2-negative tumors with distinctive histological features, including secretory droplets within tumor cells. This article presents 2 unique cases of SBC, Case 1 involving a 42-year-old woman with triple-negative mammary carcinoma later diagnosed with triple-negative secretory carcinoma, and Case 2 featuring a 48-year-old woman with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma subsequently identified as invasive mammary carcinoma of secretory type. Both cases received diverse treatment regimens, incorporating surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormone therapy. The importance of accurate diagnosis and the need for further research to optimize the management of this rare breast cancer subtype are emphasized. Raising awareness of SBC and reporting additional cases can enhance understanding and improve patient outcomes. Additionally, the integration of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings, alongside specific molecular markers like S-100 and mammaglobin, is crucial for accurate SBC diagnosis. Given the lack of established guidelines for SBC management, collecting additional cases can aid in defining a more effective strategy for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment, ultimately contributing to advancements in the field. Herein, we report 2 cases of this rare disease that were diagnosed and treated in our institution.

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