Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Association of Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake with Allergic Rhinitis in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study of NHANES 2005-2006.

INTRODUCTION: The incidence of allergic rhinitis (AR) is increasing year by year, and the pathogenesis is complex, in which diet may play an important role. The role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in AR is still controversial. Previous studies have looked at the effects of PUFA during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence. In this study, we aimed to determine the association between dietary intake of PUFA and AR in adults.

METHODS: We used the NHANES database from 2005 to 2006 to include a total of 4,211 adult subjects. We collected dietary PUFA intake data and information on AR. Logistic regression and restricted cubic spline models were constructed to examine the association between PUFA intake and AR in adults. The t test was used to compare daily PUFA intakes in patients with and without AR.

RESULTS: In the fully adjusted model (OR: 1.016; 95% CI: 1.003; 1.028), PUFA intake was positively correlated with allergic symptoms, hay fever, and AR in adults (p < 0.05). In addition, daily PUFA intake was significantly higher in people with allergic symptoms, hay fever, and AR than in people without the disease (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a positive association between dietary PUFA intake and AR in adults to a certain extent. Future studies on dietary PUFA dose will provide new strategies for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases such as AR related to non-pharmaceutical interventions.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app