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Exploring the association between a standardized extract of pequi peels (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess) and blue light as a photodynamic therapy for treating superficial wounds.

Natural products derived from plants can be used as photosensitizers for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) combining key therapeutic strategies for tissue repair while controlling microorganisms' growth. We investigated a standardized extract of pequi peels (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess) as a brownish natural photosensitizer for aPDT using blue light. Three concentrations of the pequi extract (PE; 10, 30, or 90 μg/mL) were tested solely or associated with blue laser (445 nm, 100 mW, 138 J/cm2 , 6 J, 60 s). In vitro, we quantified reactive oxygen species (ROS), assessed skin keratinocytes (HaCat) viability and migration, and aPDT antimicrobial activity on Streptococcus or Staphylococcus strains. In vivo, we assessed wound closure for the most active concentration disclosed by the in vitro assay (30 μg/mL). Upon aPDT treatments, ROS were significantly increased in cell monolayers regardless of PE concentration. PE at low doses stimulates epithelial cells. Although PE stimulated cellular migration, aPDT was moderately cytotoxic to skin keratinocytes, particularly at the highest concentration. The antimicrobial activity was observed for PE at the lowest concentration (10 μg/mL) and mostly at PE 10 μg/mL and 30 μg/mL when used as aPDT photosensitizers. aPDT with PE 30 μg/mL presents antimicrobial activity without compromising the initial phases of skin repair.

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