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TyG index is a predictor of all-cause mortality during the long-term follow-up in middle-aged and elderly with hypertension.

BACKGROUND: The triglyceride and glucose (TyG) index has been found to be significantly associated with a higher risk of mortality. However, there has been a lack of studies exploring the specific relationship between the TyG index and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among middle-aged and elderly with hypertension.

METHODS: A total of 3,614 participants with hypertension were enrolled from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The TyG index was calculated using the formula log [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) x fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]. The Cox proportional hazard ratios were used to evaluate the association between the TyG index and the risk of mortality.

RESULTS: Over a follow-up period of 7.87 years, 991 all-cause death and 189 cardiovascular deaths occurred. Compared with the reference quartile, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.28 (1.07-1.53; p  = .006) in the fourth quartile for all-cause mortality and 0.63 (0.42-0.96; p  = .031) in the second quartile for cardiovascular mortality. Dose-response analysis indicated an L-shaped relationship.

CONCLUSIONS: The TyG index exhibited an L-shaped association with the risk of all-cause mortality among middle-aged and elderly with hypertension.

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