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Memory for social media images following traumatic brain injury.

Brain Injury 2023 October 31
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: An emerging body of research examines the role of computer-mediated communication in supporting social connection in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examine the cognitive impacts of engaging with images posted to social media for persons with moderate-severe TBI.

RESEARCH DESIGN: Prior work shows that after viewing social media posts, adults have better memory for posts when they generate a comment about the post. We examined if persons with TBI experience a memory benefit for commented-upon social media images similar to non-injured comparison participants.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES: 53 persons with moderate-to-severe TBI and 52 non-injured comparison participants viewed arrays of real social media images and were prompted to comment on some of them. After a brief delay, a surprise two-alternative forced choice recognition memory test measured memory for these images.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: Persons with TBI remembered social media images at above-chance levels and experienced a commenting-related memory boost much like non-injured comparison participants.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings add to a growing literature on the potential benefits of social media use in individuals with TBI and point to the benefits of active engagement for memory in social media contexts in TBI.

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