Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Obesity Modifies Clinical Outcomes of Right Ventricular Dysfunction.

BACKGROUND: Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is associated with increased mortality across a spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. The role of obesity in RV dysfunction and adverse outcomes is unclear.

METHODS: We examined patients undergoing right heart catheterization between 2005 and 2016 in a hospital-based cohort. Linear regression was used to examine the association of obesity with hemodynamic indices of RV dysfunction (pulmonary artery pulsatility index, right atrial pressure:pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ratio, RV stroke work index). Cox models were used to examine the association of RV function measures with clinical outcomes.

RESULTS: Among 8285 patients (mean age, 63 years; 40% women), higher body mass index was associated with worse indices of RV dysfunction, including lower pulmonary artery pulsatility index (β, -0.23; SE, 0.01; P <0.001), higher right atrium:pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ratio (β, 0.25; SE, 0.01; P <0.001), and lower RV stroke work index (β, -0.05; SE, 0.01; P <0.001). Over median of 7.3 years of follow-up, we observed 3006 mortality and 2004 heart failure hospitalization events. RV dysfunction was associated with a greater risk of mortality (eg, pulmonary artery pulsatility index:hazard ratio, 1.11 per 1-SD increase [95% CI, 1.04-1.18]), with similar associations with risk of heart failure hospitalization. Body mass index modified the effect of RV dysfunction on all-cause mortality ( P interaction ≤0.005 for PAPi and RA:PCWP ratio), such that the effect of RV dysfunction was more pronounced at higher body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with obesity had worse hemodynamic measured indices of RV function across a broad hospital-based sample. While RV dysfunction was associated with worse clinical outcomes including mortality and heart failure hospitalization, this association was especially pronounced among individuals with higher body mass index.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app