Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy Due to Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome after Military Training: A Case Report.

INTRODUCTION: The common peroneal nerve (CPN) palsy in military personnel due to chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is uncommon. There are no previous reports of treatment of this condition with simultaneous CPN and superficial peroneal nerve (SPN) neurolysis and compartment release.

CASE REPORT: An 18-year-old military recruit presented with complete CPN palsy after sitting cross-legged for 2 h in training. After 3 months of failed non-operative treatment, a clinical diagnosis of CECS with CPN palsy was made and the patient was treated with simultaneous CPN and SPN neurolysis and release of the anterior and lateral leg compartments. The patient had full recovery at 6 months post-operative period and returned to sports at 1 year follow-up.

CONCLUSION: This case report of a young military recruit with CPN palsy after prolonged cross-legged sitting in the setting of CECS demonstrates successful treatment with simultaneous CPN and SPN neurolysis and anterior and lateral compartment release. Future studies should explore the efficacy of this treatment option and prevention strategies of CPN palsy in military personnel.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app