JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
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Improvement in CD4+ cell count among people with HIV in New York City, 2007-2021.

AIDS 2023 November 16
BACKGROUND: A higher CD4+ cell count among people with HIV (PWH) is associated with improved immune function and reduced HIV-related morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this analysis is to report the trend in CD4+ cell count among PWH in New York City (NYC).

METHODS: We conducted a serial cross-sectional analysis using the NYC HIV registry data and reported the proportion of PWH with a CD4+ cell count of 500 cells/μl or above, overall and by sex, race or ethnicity, and age.

RESULTS: The overall proportion of PWH in NYC with a CD4+ cell count of 500 cells/μl or above increased from 38.1% in 2007 to 63.8% in 2021. Among men, the proportion increased from 36.7% in 2007 to 62.3% in 2021 with an annual percentage change (APC) of 6.6% [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 5.8-7.5] in 2007-2013 and 2.6% (95% CI: 0.7-4.4) in 2013-2017, and no changes in 2017-2021 (APC: 0.0%; 95% CI: -1.1 to 1.0); among women, the proportion increased from 41.0% in 2007 to 67.6% in 2021 with an APC of 7.5% (95% CI: 5.2-9.8) in 2007-2010, 4.5% (95% CI: 3.5-5.4) in 2010-2015, and 0.8% (95% CI: 0.4-1.2) in 2015-2021. White people had a higher proportion than other racial/ethnic groups, 70.9, 59.3, 60.9, and 61.7%, respectively, among white, black, Latino/Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander men, and 69.8, 68.0, 66.3, and 69.3%, respectively, among white, black, Latina/Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander women in 2021.

CONCLUSION: CD4+ cell count among PWH in NYC improved during 2007-2021, but the improvement slowed in recent years.

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