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Comparison of continuous sedatives in the burn ICU on delirium and coma.

Lighter sedation targets over the past decade have resulted in improved outcomes for critically ill populations. Although guidelines exist for the general ICU population, these recommendations often exclude the burn population. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the initial continuous sedative on coma and delirium free days in critically ill burn patients. This retrospective cohort study evaluated adult patients admitted to a burn intensive care unit at an academic medical center between January 2010 and September 2019. Patients were enrolled into three groups based on depth of initial continuous sedation received (deep, light, or analgosedation). Intubated patients were randomly assessed for inclusion from the National V6 Burn Registry. Patients were included if they received a continuous sedative infusion for at least 48 hours. A total of 107 patients were included in the study with 36, 41, and 30 patients receiving deep, light, and analgosedation, respectively. The primary outcome of coma and delirium free days was significantly different between sedation types with the most days free in analgosedation and fewest in deep sedation (8 versus 3 days; p = 0.024). The composite primary outcome was divided into secondary outcomes of coma free days and delirium free days, with coma free days being different (p=0.0008). Other secondary outcomes of length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, time on mechanical ventilation, and survival to discharge were not statistically significant, however, a trend towards higher mortality in deep sedation was noted.

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