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Amphetamine Positivity Prior to Burn Surgery Does not Adversely Affect Intraoperative Outcomes.

The treatment of burn patients using amphetamines is challenging due hemodynamic labilty and altered physiology. Wide variation exists in the operative timing for this patient population. We hypothesize that burn excision in patients admitted with amphetamine positivity is safe regardless of timing. Data from two verified burn centers between 2017-2022 with differing practice patterns in operative timing for amphetamine positive patients. Center A obtains toxicology only on admission and proceeds with surgery based on hemodynamic status and operative urgency, whereas Center B sends daily toxicology until a negative test results. The primary outcome was the use of vasoactive agents during the index operation, modeled using logistic regression adjusting for burn severity and hospital days to index operation. Secondary outcomes included death and inpatient complications. A total of 270 patients were included, and there were no significant differences in demographics or burn characteristics between centers. Center A screened once and Center B obtained a median of 4 screens prior to surgery. The adjusted OR of requiring vasoactive support intraoperatively was not associated with negative toxicology result (p=0.821). Having a body surface area burned >20% conferred a significantly higher risk of vasoactive support (adj. OR 13.42 [3.90 - 46.23], p<0.001). Mortality, number of operations, stroke, and hospital length of stay were similar between cohorts. Comparison between 2 verified burn centers indicates that waiting until a negative amphetamine toxicology result does not impact intraoperative management or subsequent burn outcomes. Serial toxicology tests are unnecessary to guide operative timing of burn patients with amphetamine use.

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