Journal Article
Observational Study
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Investigation of satisfaction with short-term outcomes after switching to faricimab to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

PURPOSE: To investigate the outcomes and patient satisfaction at 6-months' follow-up after switching to faricimab to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) with a treat-and-extend (TAE) regimen.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study.

METHODS: Forty-eight consecutive eyes (48 patients) were switched to faricimab to treat nAMD and followed for 6 months on a TAE regimen. The Macular Disease Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (MacTSQ) was administered to patients 6 months after the switch.

RESULTS: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was maintained 6 months after the switch, while the mean (± standard error) central foveal thickness 6 months after the switch (272 ± 14 μm) decreased significantly compared to the time of the switch (372 ± 20 μm) (p < 0.001). The interval between injections 6 months after the switch was 10.45 ± 0.44 weeks, a significant extension from 6.72 ± 0.34 weeks at the switch (p = 0.002). The MacTSQ total score (58.8 ± 1.7) in eyes with a BCVA of 20/40 and better 6 months after the switch was significantly higher compared to that in eyes with a BCVA worse than 20/40 (48.2 ± 1.5) (p < 0.001). The MacTSQ total score (56.8 ± 1.8) in eyes in which a 4 weeks extension of the injection interval was achieved was significantly higher than (49.5 ± 1.9) in eyes without (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Switching to faricimab with a TAE regimen seems to maintain the BCVA and extend the injection interval in patients with nAMD, resulting in enhanced satisfaction.

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