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Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis in middle-aged and elderly patients with idiopathic polyneuropathy: a nationwide prospective study.

BACKGROUND: Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTRv) is an adult-onset autosomal dominant disease resulting from TTR gene pathogenic variants. ATTRv often presents as a progressive polyneuropathy, and effective ATTRv treatments are available.

METHODS: In this 5 year-long (2017-2021) nationwide prospective study, we systematically analysed the TTR gene in French patients with age >50 years with a progressive idiopathic polyneuropathy.

RESULTS: 553 patients (70% males) with a mean age of 70 years were included. A TTR gene pathogenic variant was found in 15 patients (2.7%), including the Val30Met TTR variation in 10 cases. In comparison with patients with no TTR gene pathogenic variants ( n  = 538), patients with TTR pathogenic variants more often presented with orthostatic hypotension (53 vs. 21%, p  = .007), significant weight loss (33 vs 11%, p  = .024) and rapidly deteriorating nerve conduction studies (26 vs. 8%, p  = .03). ATTRv diagnosis led to amyloid cardiomyopathy diagnosis in 11 cases, ATTRv specific treatment in all cases and identification of 15 additional ATTRv cases among relatives.

CONCLUSION: In this nationwide prospective study, we found ATTRv in 2.7% of patients with age >50 years with a progressive polyneuropathy. These results are highly important for the early identification of patients in need of disease-modifying treatments.

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