Journal Article
Observational Study
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Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion within Three-level for Patients with Neurological Symptoms due to Vertebral Fragility Fractures in the Lumbar Spine.

There is a lack of agreement on whether minimally invasive lateral lumbar intervertebral fusion (LLIF) is a suitable treatment option for vertebral fragility fractures (VFFs). Hence, we sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of LLIF in the management of VFF with neurological deficits in the lumbar spine. Between April 2015 and March 2020, we conducted a retrospective observational study of patients with VFF treated with three-level or less LLIF. The participants had previously received conservative treatment but had not been able to control their neurological symptoms. To assess the outcomes of the LLIF procedures, the patients were followed up for a minimum of 1 year. Clinical and radiological results, which include the timing and location of the bony fusion, were analyzed. The study involved 19 patients with 23 vertebral fracture levels. The residual height of the fractured vertebra was found to be 57.0 ± 12.3% of the height of the adjacent level. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association score significantly improved postoperatively. Postoperative radiological parameters were significantly maintained at 1 year, and lumbar lordosis was maintained at the last follow-up (45.0 ± 26.7). In total 31 LLIF levels, bone fusion was observed in four levels at 6 months postoperatively, in 16 levels at 1 year, and in 23 levels at the last follow-up. The facet joint had the highest bony fusion location. LLIF within three levels can be safely performed in certain VFF cases with sufficient residual vertebral height.

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