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Suspected Accidental Infiltration of Rocuronium During General Anesthesia Induction: A Case Report.

Anesthesia Progress 2023 September 2
There are few reports on rocuronium infiltration under general anesthesia. We report a case of suspected accidental rocuronium infiltration during anesthesia induction. A 25-year-old woman with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and epilepsy was scheduled for the extraction of 4 impacted third molars under general anesthesia. After induction with sevoflurane, an intravenous (IV) line was established in the left cephalic vein. Rocuronium was administered; however, subcutaneous swelling at the IV site was observed immediately. Spontaneous ventilations were maintained until additional rocuronium was administered via a new IV line. After heat pack application, the swelling disappeared 60 minutes after infiltration, and no tissue damage was observed. A strategy was developed to continue neuromuscular monitoring until recovery occurred. Acceleromyography was used, and the train-of-4 ratios at 99, 130, and 140 minutes after infiltration were 0.79, 0.91, and 1.0, respectively. Sugammadex was administered to prevent neuromuscular blockade recurrence. The patient was extubated once adequate return of muscle function and consciousness were observed. No neuromuscular block prolongation or recurrence were observed postoperatively. When rocuronium infiltration is suspected, it is important to eliminate swelling at the infiltration site and determine a management strategy based on neuromuscular monitoring.

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