Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The distribution and the antimicrobial susceptibility features of microorganisms isolated from the burn wounds; a ten-year retrospective analysis.

In this study we aimed to evaluate the distribution features and antimicrobial susceptibility test results of the microorganisms isolated from the wounds of pediatric and adult burn patients. The culture and susceptibility test results of the microorganisms isolated from the wound swabs of the patients hospitalised in a tertiary burn care center in 10-years period, were retrospectively screened on the microbiology department databases. Their distribution of isolated microorganisms regarding species and susceptibility test results were compared with previous studies. A total of 367 microorganisms isolated from the burn wounds of 293 patients (13± 18.9 years, F/M: 0.93) (73 adult and 220 pediatric patients), were included in this study. A solitary agent was isolated in 239 (81.6%) patients, while two were isolated in 43 (14.7%) and three or more agents in 11 (3.8%). From these, 33% of the isolated microorganisms were gram positive cocci, 61% were gram negative bacteria and 6% were Candida spp. The most common isolated microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%), Pseudomonas spp. (16.9) and Escherichia coli (%11.2), while the least common was Streptococcus spp. (2.5%). Methicillin resistance was 15% among the S. aureus strains. No resistance was observed against levofloxacin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, daptomycin, fusidic acid and tigecycline in S. aureus strains. The highest resistance rates were observed against levofloxacin (64%), tobramycin (64%), pip/tazobactam (63%), imipenem (63%), and the lowest against colistin (5%) and ceftazidime (29%), among Pseudomonas spp. The most common causative agents in burn wound infections and their current antimicrobial susceptibility features should be well identified, in order for prevention of serious complications and optimal management the condition to occur.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app