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Association between Fundus Tessellation and Contrast Sensitivity in Myopic Eyes.

Current Eye Research 2023 October 17
PURPOSE: To assess the association of fundus tessellation with contrast sensitivity, Quality of Vision questionnaire, and other factors at five years postcorneal refractive surgery.

METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. Both eyes of 98 subjects (196 eyes) who received femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) or small incision lenticular extraction (SMILE) five years prior were enrolled in this study. Fundus tessellation was imaged using wide-angle fundus photographs and graded into four categories with the assistance of the ETDRS grid. Photopic and mesopic contrast sensitivity were measured under the best correction. The Quality of Vision (QoV) questionnaire was used to assess visual symptoms.

RESULTS: Fundus tessellation was classified as follows: 19 eyes were grade 0 (9.7%), 28 eyes were grade 1 (14.3%), 59 eyes were grade 2 (30.1%), and 90 eyes were grade 3 (45.9%). Higher degrees of fundus tessellation were associated with lower photopic contrast sensitivity, a significant difference was observed at spatial frequencies of 6cpd ( p  = 0.030, grade 1 >grade 3 p  = 0.011). Higher degrees of fundus tessellation were also associated with lower mesopic contrast sensitivity, a significant difference was observed at spatial frequencies of 18cpd ( p  = 0.011, grade 0 >grade 3 p  = 0.012). The preoperative degree of myopia was positively associated with fundus tessellation grade ( p  < 0.001). However, in linear mixed-effect model analysis, no significant influence of parameters (contrast sensitivity, preoperative myopia, and QoV scores) upon different tessellation grades was found ( p  > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with moderate and high myopia were more likely to have higher grades of fundus tessellation. Higher degree of fundus tessellation associates with lower contrast sensitivity. Patients with moderate and high myopia should be concerned with retinal-choroidal changes. Contrast sensitivity could be a clinical sign for progression of tessellation and used to screen for early retinal-choroidal changes to prevent pathologic myopia.

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