Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Correlation between Treatment Outcomes and Serum Vitamin D Levels As Well As Infliximab Trough Concentration among Chinese Patients with Crohn's Disease.

BACKGROUND: The relationship between vitamin D (vit-D) levels and the effectiveness of infliximab (IFX) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) remains controversial.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the interaction between vit-D levels and the response to IFX therapy in patients with CD.

METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study. Serum vit-D and IFX trough concentrations (TC) were measured in 84 patients, and statistical analyses were performed.

RESULTS: The total vit-D deficiency rate at enrollment, at week 14 and week 38, was 64.3%, 41.67%, and 37.5%, respectively ( P < 0.001). CD activity index (CDAI) (120, range, 93-142.75) and simplified endoscopic activity score for CD (SES-CD) (2, range, 0-4) at week 14 were lower than that of enrollment (CDAI, 136.5, range, 101.25-196; SES-CD 13, range, 5-23) ( P < 0.001). The biochemical remission (BR), clinical remission (CR), endoscopic remission (ER), and response (ERe) rates of week 38 were 76.1%, 88.5%, 22.4%, and 67.2%, respectively. vit-D levels at enrollment were positively correlated with CDAI at week 38 ( P = 0.024). IFX serum TC was related to BR ( P = 0.036), CR ( P = 0.032) at week 14, and ERe ( P = 0.009) at week 38.

CONCLUSION: Among Chinese patients with CD, vit-D levels prior to IFX therapy are related to CDAI scores, and IFX serum TC is associated with BR, CR, and ERe.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app