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The Protective Effect of Roseburia faecis Against Repeated Water Avoidance Stress-induced Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Wister Rat Model.

Roseburia faecis, a butyrate-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, was evaluated for its usefulness against repeated water avoidance stress (WAS)-induced irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in a rat model, and the underlying mechanism was explored. We divided the subjects into three groups: one without stress exposure, another subjected to daily 1-hour WAS for 10 days, and a third exposed to the same WAS regimen while also receiving two different R. faecis strains (BBH024 or R22-12-24) via oral gavage for the same 10-day duration. Fecal pellet output (FPO), a toluidine blue assay for mast cell infiltration, and fecal microbiota analyses were conducted using 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing. Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities in metabolism was also conducted. FPO and colonic mucosal mast cell counts were significantly higher in the WAS group than in the control group (male, P = 0.004; female, P = 0.027). The administration of both BBH024 (male, P = 0.015; female, P = 0.022) and R22-12-24 (male, P = 0.003; female, P = 0.040) significantly reduced FPO. Submucosal mast cell infiltration in the colon showed a similar pattern in males. In case of fecal microbiota, the WAS with R. faecis group showed increased abundance of the Roseburia genus compared to WAS alone. Moreover, the expression of a gene encoding a D-methionine transport system substrate-binding protein was significantly elevated in the WAS with R. faecis group compared to that in the WAS (male, P = 0.028; female, P = 0.025) group. These results indicate that R. faecis is a useful probiotic for treating IBS and colonic microinflammation.

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