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Evaluation of lymph node findings in patients with and without odontogenic infection: A clinical and ultrasonographic study.

BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings of submandibular and submental lymph nodes in patients with and without odontogenic infection.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Systemically healthy patients aged 18-30 years old with or without odontogenic infections were included in this study. Clinical examinations were performed on all patients; those with any odontogenic infection were placed in the study group, and those without were placed in the control group. Ultrasonographic examinations of bilateral submental and submandibular lymph nodes were performed for both groups. The data were statistically analyzed using Pearson's Chi-square test and Student's t-test.

RESULTS: A total of 150 patients voluntarily participated (female: n=86 (57%), male: n=64 (43%)), 75 in the study group and 75 in the control group. During the ultrasonographic examination, patients in the study group had more than one lymph node the same patient was mostly detected, in the study group (right submandibular: n=42, 56%, and left submandibular: n=43, 57.3%). The long-axis diameter of the submandibular lymph nodes was 9.305.30 mm and 5.505.20 mm in the study and control groups, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasonography revealed that the presence, number, and long-axis diameter of the submandibular lymph nodes in the patients with and without odontogenic infection were statistically different.

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